Sensory Processing Disorder : The Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders

Sensory Processing Disorder : The Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders

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Sensory Processing Disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
“Our website, www.spdfoundation.net receives an average of 85,000 hits each day from individuals seeking information about this disorder, which shows how much information about the disorder is sought and needed. And although we are excluded even from the category of a diagnosis that needs further research, the challenges impacting our children live on and so do our families. Their needs are real and the importance of services is now magnified.” Sensory processing disorder is a neurological disorder which alters the way the brain manages and responds to sensory input. The latest revision to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, DSM-5, does not acknowledge sensory processing disorder as a stand-alone disorder, but considers the disorder symptoms of other disorders. Receiving the wrong diagnosis can result in the wrong treatment plan being put in place. Sensory processing disorder should be recognized as a stand-alone disorder to insure early accurate diagnosis, expand insurance coverage, and to increase awareness of the disorder.

As with any illness, obtaining an accurate early diagnosis for the patient suffering from sensory processing is a must. Starting the intervention at an early age increases the success rate of treatment. The brain of a young child is pliable and easier to change. The chances of a positive school experience is increased thanks to the rehabilitation act which allows the parents, medical personal, and teachers to put educational plans in place to accommodate a student with sensory processing disorder. Correct labeling of atypical behaviors such as: aggressive, hyper, unruly or weird are recognized ...


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...tal disorder, and neurological disorders are not excluded from this shame. Medical professionals in the mental health field must be diligent and open minded when it comes to acceptance of new disorders. They must educate themselves and help to educate the communities they practice in.

Once again, sensory processing disorder should be recognized as a stand-alone disorder. Patients need early and accurate diagnosis, expanded insurance coverage, and increased awareness. Arguments that suggest, symptoms of sensory processing disorder don’t exist, are few and far between. Yet as of the latest printing of the DSM, in 2013, sensory processing disorder is not recognized. One would have to question the reasoning behind the decision. Will egos and denial trump the truth and prevent proper available care from being administered to a patient with sensory processing disorder?

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